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Stage 3

Note-making

In this stage, students collaborate to form notes from the information that has been highlighted in the text. Students take turns to write the notes on the board in point form.

This provides opportunities for a successful cooperative activity between students who now understand the information that they are reading and writing. Students are also able to practise skills such as spelling, writing and pronouncing words, while engaging in further discussion about the meaning of the text.

In this video, students take turns to write point-form notes from each sentence. The teacher guides students to read the highlighted words aloud; then students dictate the notes to be written on the board.

As the notes are being written, the teacher takes the opportunity to reinforce and extend their meaning, deepening the students’ understanding.

Once the notes have been written, the teacher leads the class to identify how the information is organised and to 'chunk' appropriate information together. Paragraphs or topics are labelled.

Video transcritp

Presenter

[Talking head]

In the note-making strategy, the information that’s been highlighted in the text is written on the board as notes. Students take turns to scribe notes on the board, as other students dictate. This is a cooperative activity between students, who now understand the information that they’re reading and writing. It provides many opportunities for practising skills such as spelling, pronouncing words, and for further discussing their meanings.

Teacher

So it’s time now to do some note taking. If you can open your books please, I’ll get you to write this down in your books as we are writing it up on the board.

We start by looking at the Phenomenon again, back up to the beginning. So Amon, if you can come out onto the board. So what we're going to do is take it sentence-by-sentence, remember … at a time …. So put a dot point for the beginning of the sentence. And Zac, can you read out to him nice and loudly, but slowly.

[Students scribe notes on board as others dictate, and teacher guides]

Student

Water constantly…. moving.

[Student spells out ‘constantly’]

Teacher

What you're writing now is a whole section. So Zac, can you read out that highlighted bit together and then come back and give him word-by-word to write on the board.

Student

Constantly moving from one place to another. From …. one …. place …. to …. another.

Teacher

So spell out ‘another’.

[Student spells ‘another’]

OK, so in our books, getting the notes from the first sentence. I'd like you to get them too, thank you. OK, Rodney, are you ready? Would you like to go up to the board? Thank you, and Trent, looking at the second sentence and reading out the sections that we've highlighted. So another dot point. So Trent, can you just say all four words together first.

Student

Changes state in cycles. Changes …. state …. in …. cycles. Liquid water…. water vapour ….

Teacher

Vapour, good.

Students

Liquid water …. water vapour.

Teacher

OK Trent, can you be letting him know when he needs to put in a dash. So we need a dash between cycles and liquid. Yep, and one between...

Student

Between water and vapour.

Teacher

Dash.

Student

Liquid again.

Teacher

Liquid, good.

So notice we've mentioned liquid water and we've finished back at liquid water. OK, this is our cycle It's gone from liquid to vapour back down to a liquid again. All the way through. And so it’s ready to go again, and again.

Alright, Patango, do you want to come and have a turn out on the board? And Jeremy.

That’s it, thank you.

Student

Clouds.

Student

S.

Teacher

Yeah, excellent, thanks.

Student

Become.

[Student spells out ‘become’]

Student

Saturated.

[Student spells out 'saturated']

Teacher

[Teacher and class discuss diagram]

Remember, saturated was about when the clouds are becoming dark and we've got lots and lots of water there, in fact too much water. So just like you say, when you've got saturated in the rain. What does that mean?

Students

You're wet.

Teacher

It means not just a few drops on you.

Student

You're soaked.

Teacher

You're soaked, that's right, exactly.

Presenter

When the board has been filled with notes, the teacher leads the class to identify how the information is organised. In the lesson here, the teacher guides the class to identify each phase of information, which she labels on the notes, and students label on their own notes.

Teacher

[Teacher and students discuss notes]

So let's just have a look and figure out where those key parts of writing and explanation fit in again. What do we start with, when we're writing an explanation? We have to identify what we're talking about. What's it called? Say it again, Amon

Students

Phenomenon.

Teacher

Phenomenon, that's right.

[Student spells out ‘phenomenon’]

OK, Douglas, can you spell that for me?

What is all this text talking about?

Student

The water cycle.

Teacher

Water. What does the water do? Rodney?

Student

It moves from one place to another.

Teacher

It moves, excellent. So it's constantly moving. And as it moves, what else is it doing through this cycle?

Student

It changes.

Teacher

It changes state.

Presenter

[Talking head]

As the notes go up, the teacher takes opportunities to reinforce and extend the meanings they’re writing, deepening students’ understanding. Crucially every student can participate successfully in the activity, either as scribe or dictator. As it engages all students, it effectively combines classroom management with active learning.

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